ETH2220EN - African Civilizations: Socio-Historical Perspectives

Course description

This course provides an understanding of the African experience throughout history with a general overview of centers of African Civilization from antiquity through contemporary times. The major themes covered include ancient Northeast Africa, Africa’s impact on Europe, Moorish civilization, the Golden Age of West Africa, Africa and the New World, the Swahili and Africa’s decline and resurgence. The course also provides introductory knowledge of the fundamental cultural commonalties that African peoples share in the mist of linguistic and other kinds of diversity. The course also examines the influence that African Civilization has exerted on other cultures as well as the impact of cross cultural contacts on the African experience

How this course benefits students

Students learn to assess global civilizations in the context of Africa. The goal of the course is to give Christ-centered students the historical-cultural enrichment skills and tools that are used by the Holy Spirit in helping understand and clarify their specific calling.

Why this course is important

This course strives to fulfill the mandate of integrating awareness as to the significant contributions of Africa to the development of western civilization.

Credit hours
3 hours
Subject area
Ethnic Studies
Educational level
Associate
Learning type
Instructional
Prerequisites
None
Upcoming terms
Pending
* Schedule subject to change. Please contact the Registrar's office with schedule questions.
Professor
Prof. Michael King, Instructor in African Studies
Certificates

How this course relates to missional core values

Biblically based

The course is driven by the command to make disciples of all nations and by the belief that evangelistic interracial/inter-cultural understanding is the most effective way to carry out that command. Acts and the epistles bear out that fact. This course activates and validates those so called to such ministerial outreach.

Missionally driven

Properly defined, Christian education is by nature evangelistic and intended to primarily uplift, inform and unify humanity under God. Those who take this course learn to identify and examine those things which unite and uplift humanity.

Contextually informed

Students learn to assess global history and cultural in the context of Africa. The goal of the course is to give Christ-centered students the historical-cultural enrichment skills and tools that will be used by the Holy Spirit in helping understand and clarify their specific calling. Essentially, students must insist that “one experience does not fit all.”

Interculturally focused

Similarly, students must strive to be culturally aware, possess intercultural skills, and demonstrate inter- and cross-cultural church fellowship.

Practically minded

The course examines history and culture, but also requires the student to integrate these and develop tools, methods, and systems for greater spiritual/critical thought and reflection.

Experientially transformed

The student develops tools and systems that he/she can adapt and implement in the context in which they serve.