JUD5410EN - Rabbinic Texts & Traditions

Course description

Exploration of selected Rabbinic texts in the Mishnah, Tosefta, Midrash and the Babylonian and Palestinian Talmuds and introduces the student to the tools, methodology and approach necessary for the study of these texts in order to explain and analyze the range of meaning traditionally assigned to them by the rabbis. Students will read, research, reflect, write and discuss the texts and traditions of the rabbinic period, along with their additions and interpretations, and gain an ability to contextualize the rise of Rabbinic Judaism within the broader scope of comparative religious studies.

How this course benefits students

In addition to the foundational texts of Judaism—Torah, Prophets and Writings (TaNaKh) of the Hebrew Bible—there are also supplemental sacred texts that are authoritative in the history, life, faith, practice and identity that defines the Jewish religion. Students familiar with the Rabbinic texts will better understand Jewish identity formation but also gain opportunities to engage the Jewish community within their knowledge and value structure.

Why this course is important

therefore it is incumbent upon the missional learner to become familiar with the sources of this ethical system.

Credit hours
3 hours
Subject area
Judaic Studies
Educational level
Master
Learning type
Instructional
Prerequisites
None
Upcoming terms
Pending
* Schedule subject to change. Please contact the Registrar's office with schedule questions.
Professor
Dr. Kevin O'Brien, Professor of Judaic Studies

How this course relates to missional core values

Biblically based

Texts examined in this course are “post-biblical” but comprise expansions, developments and interpretations of the biblical literature and ethical teachings inspired by the Bible.

Missionally driven

Evangelicals may be called to interact and engage in dialogue with a Jewish community whose ethical system owes much to the rabbinic texts

Contextually informed

therefore it is incumbent upon the missional learner to become familiar with the sources of this ethical system.

Interculturally focused

Evangelicals may be called to interact and engage in dialogue with a Jewish community whose ethical system owes much to the rabbinic texts

Practically minded

therefore it is incumbent upon the missional learner to become familiar with the sources of this ethical system.

Experientially transformed

Evangelicals may be called to interact and engage in dialogue with a Jewish community whose ethical system owes much to the rabbinic texts